• September 25, 2016
    Last updated 2 minutes ago

letters

Focus on your work and expect results

Readers discuss whether money is a top priority for job happiness

Gulf News readers
17:18 September 18, 2016
RDS_160919 YT Letters

Focus on your work and expect results

It’s obvious that we need money to survive and that’s why people look for a job, but it’s never been my priority to have job happiness (‘Salary is top priority for job happiness’, Gulf News, September 14). My happiness is the satisfaction level of service that I give to my company. When I see a smile on my superior’s face, even when he doesn’t say something, I am happy. My salary is quite low, much lower than I anticipated, but I still focus on my job with happiness. If I ever get sad about anything, it is the start of my problems. My salary can only give me the courage to apply more effort, but it cannot determine my happiness.

From Mr Chijioke Promise
Ajman
Facebook comment

 

Common sense!

Obviously, salary is a top priority. How can you be happy with an empty pocket? It’s commonsense.

From Mr Syed Ansar Hussain
Dubai
Facebook comment

 

Not feasible

Imagine life without proper compensation. It’s not feasible.

From Mr Brenan Poe Abrogena Ibasco
UAE
Facebook comment

 

It’s a package deal

If you have a good salary, happiness comes as part of the package. Without money, the job is like a plastic rose - it looks good, but it’s really not.

From Mr Shankar Gautam
UAE
Facebook comment

 

It comes full circle

Peace of mind is my top concern, and worker satisfaction! Money will come with peace. When customers see how happy you are at work, they will pay to support happiness.

From Ms Monia Rafique
UAE
Facebook comment

 

Happy employees are needed

It’s true, because employees sacrifice themselves to work hard and deliver good service for a business, but in the end, the employees are disappointed with their low salaries and the false promises of increments from their employers or companies. The truth is that most of the companies don’t care about the employees who run their businesses, rather they care about achieving the goals of their businesses. Therefore, my question is, how can a company achieve their targets every quarter without the support of employees? We are the beadwinners for our families.

From Mr Amir A.
Dubai
Facebook comment

 

Your ability is your asset

Salary raises are obviously a top priority for all. However, most of the employees in the private sector want it in the UAE, without having a single clue as to how their employer is going to afford it. All employees must understand that their income is an expense for their employer. The employer’s desire to make more profits is as intense as their desire to make a higher salary. In case of the authorities, the objective is the overall governance of the department and not the profit alone.

The bitter truth is that whomsoever thinks and works hard to benefit their employer with loyalty gets a higher salary. Those who wish for a higher salary without measuring their contribution to employers’ profit will lose their jobs, forget salary increase!

I say, if you want more money for yourself, help your employer with more money for their objectives. If you don’t get a pay rise even after that, quit. Your ability is your asset and if one does not value it, then someone else will.

From Mr C. G.
UAE
Facebook comment

 

Get promoted

When I was in a younger age bracket, my number one priority was career advancement.

From Mr Nassim Abed
Abu Dhabi
Facebook comment

 

Stable jobs matter

Priorities are influenced by various factors. Of course, age, gender, culture, lifestyle and industry will affect one’s attitude. I think, with the current increasing economic uncertainty, all age groups are more concerned about job security or working in a stable sector. As more organisations are forced to adopt cost reduction and restructuring strategies, we will soon see this trend in future surveys.

From Mr Khalid Suliman
Dubai
Facebook comment

 

Can’t work underpaid

Well, would you like to be underpaid or work with no salary at all? It’s commonsense to want a higher salary. No one wants to work for someone for free.

From Mr Sulaiman Rahmatulah Barakatuh
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Facebook comment

 

It’s a choice

Happiness is a personal choice and you can choose to be happy regardless of the salary and job that you have. If you do what you love, you don’t have to go to work, as a wise man once said.

The problem starts with mismanagement of financial income. You are one who is responsible for your children and their education, among other things, at the end of the day.

From Mr Taha Yassin
Dubai
Facebook comment

 

Employee morale

Obviously, salary would be the top priority for job happiness. When employees are paid a pleasing salary, they work wholeheartedly because they may be pleased by the salary paid to them. This is unlike being paid less and expecting a good performance anyway, from the employee.

If the employee is paid less, he might not react positively to his employers, but in actual sense, he does the work negatively.

From Mr Kanyesigye Boaz
UAE
Facebook comment

 

No motivation

Getting a high salary gives mental satisfaction, which directly influences output and the quality of the company. If an employee is not getting enough, he would just be passing time. He would not be efficient and would not give the required output. It’s so simple.

From Mr Iftikhar Ahmad
UAE
Facebook comment

 

Give him time!

I read the article from top to bottom and I agree with the writer (‘Readers Views: Are Duterte’s outbursts needed?’, Gulf News, September 12). We need to give Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte at least six months to accomplish his campaign promise and for sure, there will be less crime in the country.

From Mr Reynaldo P. Casayas
Abu Dhabi
Facebook comment

 

Barrier for peace

Actually, the so-called international community is the main barrier for peace and stability in the world. And for the Philippines, Duterte is the right person on the right track.

From Mr Noor Al Islam
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Facebook comment

 

Making enemies

What Duterte does in his own country is his and his people’s business. Other leaders do not like him because he is honest and will shame them if they dare question him or his methods. Most leaders like him end up getting assassinated for their overtly strong views.

From Mr Hassan Al Khaja
Dubai
Facebook comment

 

No short cuts for justice

The writer said: “How would you like it if someone interfered with the way you discipline your children? Would anyone like an external person interfering in your attempt to bring peace in your own home?” Will that neighbour just ignore the cries of the children next door when the parents themselves are the abusers? Will the neighbour just pretend he does not hear anything and just ignore it? I am strongly against these drug users and suppliers, but the recent actions provoked and condoned by the president himself, Duterte, leaves thousands dead, with suspects not facing a minute in court. Is this justifiable? Don’t all people have the right to defend themselves in the court of law? Hence, the authorities perpetuating these actions should be considered criminals themselves. Those suspects, if found guilty, should be punished accordingly... there should be no shortcuts in attaining justice.

From Mr Jun M. Cargullo
UAE
Facebook comment

 

Common people suffer

According to a news report, a young police officer from Kashmir tied the knot with a Pakistani girl. The two families are related to each other, but were separated during the partition in 1947.

It is a matter to note that the people living along the line of control (LOC) have been the worst sufferers of the conflict and acrimony between India and Pakistan. Opening of all traditional routes between these two neighbouring countries would increase people-to-people contact, leading to better understanding between each other.

In 1947, most families were divided and were left split on either side. As such, people of the Subcontinent are emotionally attached to each other because of historic relations, the same language, culture and neighbours. The citizens of both the countries have a keen desire to see their dear and near without the difficulties of visa and border impediments. The imperial line drawn in blood between India and Pakistan was the outcome of divide-and-rule policies of the British. Regretfully, today’s leaders on both sides of the border are still refining this evil practice.

I request the governments of both countries to please realise the tremendous difficulties being faced by the people of India and Pakistan due to border restrictions and visa impediments.

From Mr Mumtaz Hussain
Dubai

 

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