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Don’t dismiss depression as a trivial issue

Readers write to Gulf News about issues affecting them and their community

18:22 March 19, 2017

Don’t dismiss depression as a trivial issue

Before anyone comments on this report, all I want to say is, be compassionate (“Man climbs roof of Abu Dhabi petrol station and threatens to kill himself”, Gulf News, March 16). Not being able to take your attention away from suicide is not stupidity. It’s hard to explain to people who might not have experienced it, but there are times when depression – not just mere sadness – eats away at all the rationality you thought you had. You feel like it’s really the end of it all, and there is no use in staying alive. Additionally, not everyone gets the support they need, emotionally and medically. And family members and friends, instead of helping out, take things lightly. They even add to the burden by saying: “Just try to feel better. Your problem is so small, others have it too, and they do not seem as depressed as you are.” Or they say: “I feel like that sometimes, too. You are just overreacting.” Depression is a serious mental disorder. Just because some people can handle it better than others doesn’t mean it is silly or trivial or whatever you may call it. Such people need professional help. They need loved ones to talk to them, so they can release their emotional baggage. Let’s try and place ourselves in their shoes, so we can understand how they feel!

From Mr Kevin

Dubai

Facebook comment

No empathy

Well said, Mr Kevin. I wish more people understood this, but so many seem to lack the emotional maturity to be able to put themselves in someone else’s shoes. They seem not to understand, unless they are in the situation themselves.

From Ms Morvarid Jalali

Dubai

Facebook comment

Dangerous

A person would not die by falling from such a height. Rather, he would be badly injured, with multiple fractures. I think it is best to deport such people. If they can attempt to take their own life, they can do so to others. They are a danger to society.

From Mr Syed Murtaza Khadri

Muscat, Oman

Facebook comment

Be kind

It breaks my heart to see people using the laughing emoji, when commenting on this report. This poor man was so distressed, he clearly felt alone and helpless in a country away from his homeland, and his loved ones. Instead of finding ways to help such people, why are people laughing? Please reach out and help each other. We live in a world that is connected in every way. May God bless him and grant him peace and offer him what he needs to make it through. Let’s be kind, please.

From Ms Mohana Rao

UAE

Facebook comment

Words can strike hard

There are people who are emotionally weak. A simple stressor could lead them to depression and suicide. Such drastic steps are a call for help, and we should be compassionate towards people, instead of judging them. If we cannot say something good or positive to help, maybe it is better not to say anything at all and to keep our thoughts to ourselves, because you never know… the things you say could be a reason for someone else’s depression.

From Ms M. Belle

Abu Dhabi

Facebook comment

Professionalism on the scene

How Abu Dhabi Police handled this situation is something to note. The authorities made sure there was no crowd blocking the road. In the video, you can see a police official telling a curious motorist to move on. They kept speaking with the poor man on the rooftop. Good going, Abu Dhabi Police.

From Mr Zeeshan Arshad

UAE

Facebook comment

My phone is spying on me!

I am so glad there was an article in The Views on this phenomenon (“Is your phone listening in on you?”, Gulf News, March 16). Just recently, as I was driving with Google Maps on, and talking to my husband, who was in the passenger seat, we heard a third voice. Both of us fell silent. The phone was speaking up and it seemed to be Google. It said: “If you just said something, I didn’t hear it.” I was completely baffled! To think that our seemingly innocuous gadgets are listening in on our conversations is downright scary. What’s next? Will our smartphone camera turn on and spy on us? We don’t realise how we are always connected, with our smartphones close at hand. Intimate details of our life are on display to our devices. I hope governments worldwide ensure the technology industry is keeping customers’ privacy safe. New laws need to be instated, as we are in a new era of innovation.

From Ms Alicia Thomson

Dubai

Let them know who you are

Is it so terrible for our search websites and social profiles to know exactly what we are interested in and what we don’t like? As far as I am concerned, that means my Facebook timeline will show me advertisements that may actually appeal to me, rather than bombard me with products I would never buy in a million years. We all talk about how terrified we are about our privacy being compromised, but think about it. You are in charge of how much of your own information you want to reveal or hide – so be more discerning on social networks. But if they discover you like peppermint or suede shoes, I think that’s harmless information and can actually help decrease the clutter you see when browsing.

From Mr Jonah Elias

Abu Dhabi

Hate crimes must be taken seriously

When bias motivates an unlawful act, it is a hate crime (“Facebook debate: What is responsible for a rise in hate crimes?”, Gulf News, March 19). Race, ethnicity and religion inspire most hate crimes. Of late, such gruesome misdeeds have become prevalent worldwide. Almost every day, there are several reports of violent crimes committed by people in the name of race, caste, creed and sects. Innocent and vulnerable people are threatened, intimidated, abused and attacked. Such incidents have a devastating emotional and psychological impact on ordinary people, leaving them traumatised and desolate. People who commit hate crimes terrorise not only individuals but also their communities. In some cases, these appalling crimes reflect the resurgence of xenophobia, anti-religious sentiment and other forms of bigotry. Governments around the world ought to take such crimes seriously, address the grave issues and find a solution. That said, individuals too, have a stake in a society that embraces tolerance and builds a better world.

From Ms Jayashree Kulkarni

Abu Dhabi

Facebook comment

Vicious cycle

As a sociology student, I feel the main reason for hate crimes is the social stratification of different people into religion, caste, colour or creed. If a government or any kind of private organisation opposes a certain group, that group would find it really hard to get a job. Poverty then leads to crime. In this day and age, money is necessary for survival and if people are unable to acquire any sort of living, they resort to illegal ways of obtaining what they want. You often find that a majority of crimes are done for money. If things get too desperate, people become disillusioned, yearn to seek revenge, and may even commit a crime as drastic as murder. Even in everyday life, socially stratified groups face social deprivation and it raises their frustration. They overthink everything and start getting strange ideas. It can eventually lead to psychological problems, which can be anything, from a huge amount of aggression to feeling suicidal. So my belief is that social stratification causes the majority of the crimes in the world.

From Mr Mohammad Omar Chagani

UAE

Facebook comment

Welcome move

An Indian-American has been sworn in as the head of a top healthcare agency in the US (“Indian-American sworn-in as head of top US health care agency”, Gulf News, March 16). The recent appointment of Seema Verma in Donald Trump’s administration was a dramatic and welcome development for US politics. She has vast experience in healthcare and would be an asset.

From Mr K. Ragavan

Bengaluru, India

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